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The library is a searchable online bilingual database of peer-reviewed literature, grey literature, as well as data resources on all matters related to health human resources within and concerning Canada.

The international migration of health care professionals

Author
Zubaran C
Journal
Australasian Psychiatry
Volume
20
Issue
6
Pages
512-7
E-Pub Date
2012
Document Type
Type of Data Source
Hits
60
Language
English
Keywords
Australia Developed Countries Developing Countries Emigrants and Immigrants/psychology* Foreign Medical Graduates/psychology Foreign Medical Graduates/standards Health Personnel/psychology Health Personnel/trends* Humans International Cooperation New Zealand Psychiatry/manpower* Psychiatry/standards Social Discrimination/psychology
OBJECTIVES:
The international migration of health care professionals has been recognized as a public health concern. A series of 'push' and 'pull' factors have been identified as driving forces for migration of doctors. The USA, UK, Canada and Australia are the main beneficiaries of medical migration, which has adverse consequences for health care systems in developing countries. Recently, a Global Code of Practice on the International Recruitment of Health Personnel was adopted by the World Health Assembly. In this paper, a summary of the most important recommendations of the Code is presented. In addition, the case of overseas trained psychiatrists in Australia is illustrated. These specialists complain of discriminatory practices due to the lack of recognition of their professional credentials. Research evidence from different countries confirms that international medical graduates face discriminatory obstacles to exercise their rights and practise their professions in developed countries.

CONCLUSIONS:
An international strategy is required to promote sustainable health care systems worldwide. Additional academic and scientific partnerships must be established between developed and developing nations in order to minimize discrepancies. There is an urgent need to review policies related to the recognition of medical credentials in host countries, including Australia. There are clear implications for psychiatry and psychiatrists.